Tarot of the Witches
Review by Michele Jackson

If you would like to purchase this deck, click here.

If you would like to purchase the book/deck set, click here.

This deck by Fergus Hall is also known as the "James Bond 007 Tarot Deck," having been designed for the James Bond movie ,"Live and Let Die." I believe this deck also appeared in an episode of the X-Files. The art is described in the little booklet as "curious dreamlike fantasies in a style similar but not exactly belonging to the surrealist movement." That said, the people depicted in this deck appear to be the victims of an overzealous upper body development program, with broad shoulders and chest, exaggerated upper arms, and stunted lower bodies and legs. Aside from this oddity, and the artist's fondness for long black hair and beards, the art is well done, with deep rich colors, and good detail. The scenes are fairly straight forward with a central character dominating most of the image. The cards measure 4 1/4" X 2 3/4". The Major Arcana have the card number on the top and the card name on the bottom. The court consists of King, Queen, Knight and Valet. The suits are Swords, Batons, Cups, and Coins. The Minor Arcana are pips. The Swords have a red background with a winged foot in the center of each card; the Batons have a brown background with a hand and a broken budded branch in the center; the Cups have a blue background with a heart pierced by an arrow in the center; and the Coins have a green background with a pentagram surrounded by sun, moon, stars and rainbows.

The little booklet for this deck provides some dated, rather sensational information about witchcraft, followed by instructions for the "one of the most ancient card spreads for tarot reading..." The spread appears to be the Celtic Cross, though it has been beefed up with information about "magic circles." Next is a brief history of the Tarot, some background information on this specific deck, and brief, upright-only interpretations of the Major Arcana. A more detailed description of how to lay the "ancient ten card spread" follows. It is called "The Magick Circle of Solomon," despite its amazing similarity in format and interpretation to the Celtic Cross. Finally brief, keyword, upright-only interpretations are given for the Minor Arcana. This deck was released rather early in U.S. Games history (1973), and a certain amount of sensationalism, which is not seen in more recent offerings is apparent.

There is also a separate book available for this deck. It contains descriptions of the scenes on the cards, more detailed upright interpretations and reversed interpretations. The "ten card spread" is accompanied by two other spreads: "The Seventh Card Spread" (21 cards) and "The Royal Card Spread" (54 cards). This deck can sometimes be found in a box that describes it as the "James Bond 007 Tarot Deck." I am told that the box is illustrated with stills from "Live and Let Die." My deck is in a purple box that says "Tarot of the Witches." I recommend this deck for collectors or James Bond movie fans.

See more cards from the Tarot of the Witches Deck

If you would like to purchase this deck, click here.

If you would like to purchase the book/deck set, click here.

Tarot of the Witches Deck, ISBN: 0-913866-53-9
The Tarot of the Witches Book by Stuart Kaplan, ISBN: 0-913866-40-7
 
Available from US Games Systems, 179 Ludlow St., Stamford CT, 06902, (800) 544-2637, Fax: (203) 353- 8431


This page is Copyright 1998 by Michele Jackson